Ödevlerde
ücretsiz yardım!

Soruların %80'i 10 dakika içerisinde yanıt alır

Ödev ekle

Telefonuna yükle

Android iOS

Ödev

takip et

Cevaplar

Albert Einstein was born in Germany in 1879. He enjoyed classical music and played the violin. One story Einstein liked to tell about his childhood was of a wonder he saw when he was four or five years old: a magnetic compass. The needle's invariable northward swing, guided by an invisible force, profoundly impressed the child. The compass convinced him that there had to be "something behind things, something deeply hidden."
Even as a small boy Albert Einstein was self-sufficient and thoughtful. According to family legend he was a slow talker, pausing to consider what he would say. His sister remembered the concentration and perseverance with which he would build houses of cards.
Albert Einstein's first job was that of patent clerk.
In 1933, he joined the staff of the newly created Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. He accepted this position for life, living there until his death. Einstein is probably familiar to most people for his mathematical equation about the nature of energy, E = MC2.
Albert Einstein wrote a paper with a new understanding of the structure of light. He argued that light can act as though it consists of discrete, independent particles of energy, in some ways like the particles of a gas. A few years before, Max Planck's work had contained the first suggestion of a discreteness in energy, but Einstein went far beyond this. His revolutionary proposal seemed to contradict the universally accepted theory that light consists of smoothly oscillating electromagnetic waves. But Einstein showed that light quanta, as he called the particles of energy, could help to explain phenomena being studied by experimental physicists. For example, he made clear how light ejects electrons from metals.
There was a well-known kinetic energy theory that explained heat as an effect of the ceaseless motion of atoms; Einstein proposed a way to put the theory to a new and crucial experimental test. If tiny but visible particles were suspended in a liquid, he said, the irregular bombardment by the liquid's invisible atoms should cause the suspended particles to carry out a random jittering dance. One should be able to observe this through a microscope, and if the predicted motion were not seen, the whole kinetic theory would be in grave danger. But just such a random dance of microscopic particles had long since been observed. Now the motion was explained in detail. Albert Einstein had reinforced the kinetic theory, and he had created a powerful new tool for studying the movement of atoms.
The Atomic Bomb
Please don't build one at home. On August 2nd 1939, just before the beginning of World War II, Einstein wrote to then President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Einstein and several other scientists told Roosevelt of efforts in Nazi Germany to purify U-235 with which might in turn be used to build an atomic bomb. It was shortly thereafter that the United States Government began the serious undertaking known only then as the Manhattan Project. Simply put, the Manhattan Project was committed to expedient research and production that would produce a viable atomic bomb. [The Letter]

odev35 kullanıcısının avatarı Odev35 09.03.2013 Teşekkürler (0)
ŞİKAYET BİLDİR!

Yorum ekle

Glikoz ve bazı birkaç madde hücre zarının her tarafından hücreye geçiş yapamaz. Bu maddeler sadece hücre zarı üzerinde bulunan özel proteinlere bağlanarak içeri geçerler. Bu proteinlerden hücre zarı üzerinde bol miktarda bulunur, glikoz proteine çarptığında kayarak içeri girer. Buna kolaylaştırılmış difüzyon denir.

Kolaylaştırılmış difüzyon normal difüzyon gibi enerji harcanmadan yapılır ve çok yoğun yerden az yoğuna geçiş olur. 

beyblade244 kullanıcısının avatarı Beyblade244 09.03.2013 Teşekkürler (0)
ŞİKAYET BİLDİR!

Yorum ekle

Aradağını bulamadın mı?

Soru sor